Portrait of Margaret Burne-Jones

Sir Edward Burne-Jones’ portrait of his daughter Margaret is another example of  mirror paintings that I adore. It’s not the mirror itself that I love; I am captivated by paintings whose mirrors that allow us a view of an opposite side of the room. Previous ‘mirror’ posts include Seeking out mirrors, Circe offering the cup…
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The Impossible Mirror of Lady Lilith

I’ve mentioned my love of mirror paintings before: Circe Offering the Cup to Odysseus, Viola, Photograph of Fanny Cornforth, Seeking out mirrors, and Preparing for the Ball. It’s understandable if we fail to notice the mirror in Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s Lady Lilith (previous post about the painting here).  Our eyes are naturally drawn to Lilith,…
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Circe Offering the Cup to Odysseus

There are many artistic representations of Circe.  Previous posts on this blog include Circe Invidiosa and The Wine of Circe.  Kirsty Stonell Walker explores Circe more deeply in her post Snowdrops, Swine and Seductive Sorceresses. I’ve been looking at mirrors in Pre-Raphaelite art in my previous posts.  In Il Dolce Far Niente and Viola, the…
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Seeking out Mirrors

I’m not sure why I’m so drawn to paintings with mirrors in them, but I seem to seek them out. Specifically, mirrors on walls — not mirrors as a symbol of vanity. When I see a mirror in the background, I feel as if the artist has offered me a different perspective, allowing me to…
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Preparing for the Ball

I have a weakness for paintings with mirrors in them.  Preparing for the Ball by Emma Sandys is a perfect example.  According to Pre-Raphaelite Women Artists by Jan Marsh and Pamela Gerrish Nunn, this painting has been known by more than one title:  Preparing for the Ball, Before the Mirror and The Lady of Shalott. …
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The Mirror!

In this previous post, I mentioned a mirror seen in Fair Rosamund and Queen Eleanor by Burne-Jones and also in The Return of Tibullus to Delia by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. This seemingly mundane object has captured my attention, mainly because I have this nagging feeling that I’ve also seen it elsewhere, but can’t remember where….
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In which we discuss multi-faceted mirrors

Tonight I was browsing through images and happened upon The Return of Tibullus to Delia by Dante Gabriel Rossetti.  This painting interests for many reasons, mainly because it marks the early period of Rossetti’s relationship with Elizabeth Siddal.   It has been written that when Rossetti was sketching his study for Delia, that he fell in…
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The mirror crack’d from side to side

The curse has come upon the Lady of Shalott… and”The mirror crack’d from side to side” The photo above is from the final day of filming of The Lady of Shalott film project. A previous post about this project can be read here and more photos can also be seen at The Beautiful Necessity here…
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The Baleful Head

The Baleful Head, painted by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones Burne Jones depicts Perseus showing Andromeda the head of the slain Medusa.  According to mythology, even looking at the dead Medusa would turn you to stone and she could only be viewed safely through her reflection. Notice while Andromeda is looking at Medusa, Perseus is gazing…
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Rossetti’s Lilith

Dante Gabriel Rossetti originally painted Lilith using Fanny Cornforth as a model when he began painting it in 1864. For some reason, in 1868, he changed the face from Fanny’s to that of another of his favorite models,  Alexa Wilding. According to Hebrew myth, Lilith was Adam’s wife before Eve. Lilith had refused to be…
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La Bella Mano

La Bella Mano, painted by Dante Gabriel Rossetti – 1875, oil, Delaware Art Museum. Models: Alexa Wilding as the woman, May Morris (daughter of William and Jane Morris) as the angel. More at Rossetti Archive. Rossetti’s Sonnet for La Bella Mano: O lovely hand, that thy sweet dost lave In that thy pure and proper…
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