‘The Dryad’, Evelyn De Morgan

Dryads are nymphs of the trees.  Their connection with the tree they lived in was so strong, they would die when the tree died. Purple irises are at her feet, symbolizing the minor Greek goddess Iris.  Iris is the messenger of the gods, particularly Zeus and Hera.  She is also the personification of the rainbow…
Read more

Demeter and Persephone

In De Morgan’s painting,  we see Demeter as she mourns the loss of her daughter.  Stricken with grief,  she clasps her head–surrounded by shafts of wheat,  denoting Demeter’s role as goddess of the harvest. The tale of Demeter and Persephone personifies the depth of a mother’s love.  It is a myth about the death and…
Read more

Ariadne

Ariadne was a daughter of Minos, king of Crete.  She defied her father by helping his prisoner, Theseus, who had been imprisoned in the Minotaur’s labrynth.  Ariadne gave him the thread that he used to find his way to freedom after killing the monster.  In helping Theseus, she risked the anger and retribution of her…
Read more

Circe Offering the Cup to Odysseus

There are many artistic representations of Circe.  Previous posts on this blog include Circe Invidiosa and The Wine of Circe.  Kirsty Stonell Walker explores Circe more deeply in her post Snowdrops, Swine and Seductive Sorceresses. I’ve been looking at mirrors in Pre-Raphaelite art in my previous posts.  In Il Dolce Far Niente and Viola, the…
Read more

Love Personified

Today I have been pondering allegories of love in art.  Namely, the choices artists make when representing the concept of Love in physical form.  It is usually male and I assume that the root of this lies in Greek myths of Eros, god of love, or Cupid, his Roman counterpart. While many today think of…
Read more

The Winds of Waterhouse

Zephyrus The Awakener Come, thou awakener of the spirit’s ocean, Zephyr, whom to thy cloud or cave No thought can trace! speed with thy gentle motion! –Percy Bysshe Shelley “ZEPHYROS (or Zephyrus) was the god of the west wind, one of the four directionalAnemoi (Wind-Gods). He was also the god of spring, husband of Khloris (Greenery), and father of Karpos…
Read more

Goddess of Soul and Memory

I love how names from ancient mythology still permeate our language. They do not shrivel and fall away. They persist. Today we use the word psyche to sum up everything that we are. It is our soul, our mind. It is both our conscious and unconscious. Our subconscious fears and troubles lurk in our psyche….
Read more

Mythic March

A few weeks ago, Grace Nuth posted a beautiful and brilliant idea at Domythic Bliss.  In her first post introducing the concept of Mythic March, Grace describes the birth of a simple idea between friends.  A seed sown during a message between her and Lisa Stock grew into an alternative to NaNoWriMo, with an emphasis on…
Read more

Mnemosyne

Via Theoi.com: MNEMOSYNE was Titan goddess of memory and remembrance and the inventress of language and words. As a Titan daughter of Ouranos (Heaven), Mnemosyne was also a goddess of time. She represented the rote memorisation required, before the introduction of writing, to preserve the stories of history and sagas of myth. In this role she was represented…
Read more

Ah, Pandora

There is a problem that arises as you become more and more immersed in Pre-Raphaelite art:  it is quite hard to stick to a small, select group of favorites.  I think I love them all.  I wonder if I am losing my ability to be discerning. My feelings about paintings seem to shuffle and shift…
Read more

More on Waterhouse’s Undine and Mermaids

Apparently I can not resist their lure and mermaids have become my theme of the week. Previously I shared that I had read Undine, which prompted a post of Undine images by artists Waterhouse and Rackham and yesterday’s post featuring mermaid images by Burne-Jones and Waterhouse.  I was browsing through a book about Waterhouse this…
Read more

Mermaids

Last week, I posted about reading the classic fairy tale Undine, in which a water spirit marries a human in order to gain a soul.  If you seek the enchantments of water-women, then a dose of Burne-Jones is in order: The Sea-Nymph: One of the most haunting images I’ve ever seen, The Depths of the…
Read more

Apollo and Daphne

Hardly had she finished her prayer when her little limbs grew heavy and sluggish, thin bark enveloped her soft breasts; her hair grew into leaves, her arms into branches.  Her feet, which until now had run so swiftly, held fast with clinging roots.  Her face was the tree’s top; only her beauty remains.  (Classical Mythology,…
Read more

Medea

Medea by Frederick Sandys Sandys portrays Medea as a powerful beauty and I especially love the abalone shell included among the other details of the painting.  She’s wearing a coral necklace mentioned in my post Rossetti and his baubles and in these posts at The Beautiful Necessity: The Pre-Raphaelites and “Hippie” Beads and Hippie Beads…
Read more

Helen of Troy by Evelyn De Morgan

I have a weakness for art inspired by literary and mythological themes, so I can not resist comparing Evelyn De Morgan’s Helen of Troy with the Pre-Raphaelite artists that came before her.   I’ve written a bit about Eveylyn De Morgan before in this post.  She was heavily influenced by Burne-Jones and was inspired by…
Read more

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...