The Rise of Every Day Design

I recently visited The Rise of Every Day Design: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain and America, which is currently running at The Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas.

Look for my review of the exhibit in the next issue of The Pre-Raphaelite Society Newsletter of the United States, available to members of The Pre-Raphaelite Society.

Exploring the Arts and Crafts movement, especially being so close to sketches by John Ruskin, William Morris, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and Sir Edward Burne-Jones was extremely poignant and moving for me. The section on Elbert Hubbard was particularly informative.

It’s a fascinating exhibit that you still have time to visit! It ends July 14th, so make plans now!

Interested in joining the Pre-Raphaelite Society? Learn the society’s aims here. I’m a proud member and am happy to invite you to join us.

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3 Replies to “The Rise of Every Day Design”

  1. Since about 1972, I have been a particularly strong follower and “Lover” of the PRB, especially DG Rossetti. I once (back then) owned a copy and in (pristine condition) of Dante’s La Vita Nuova.
    This had never been translated prior to the time that DG Rossetti translated it, illustrated it, had it printed in an edition of 500 or perhaps even less.
    Rossetti had it printed on Japaned Vellum, with full page engravings (illustrations) with silk tissue in front of each engraving, and a dark blue Leather on board cover with a deeply embossed illustrated cover. I bought it along with many other pieces from the estate of a very famous American artist and Futurist… Raymond Johnson.
    He owned an English style Arts and Crafts home in Lake Oswego Oregon. Also he either handmade or carved or painted every square inch of the interior of this incredible home.
    I also was able to buy the First Edition 1856, also in pristine condition, The Grammar of Ornament by Owen Jones. This was in the late 1970′ or perhaps early 1980′. The artists last name may have been spelled Jonson. Although he was a”Futurist” in style and genre, he was a true Arts and Crafts afficionado, such as Kelmscott or Mackmurdo or Voysey. He was more British in his homes interior decor and Art collection, than Tiffany or Elbert Hubbard or the Californians such as Greene and Greene etc. His studio which was in his home was absolutely filled with his art other art..objets des vertu, and incredible books
    I my wife and I had a shop/gallery in Portland named Vogel is and we went to every estate sale possible, often sleeping 2 nights (at least one) in the car to insure being either 1st, 2nd or 3rd to enter the home at opening.
    Portland Oregon was a unique “Goldmine” in those days. I was able to buy original 2nd school PRB drawings and works on paper.
    The estate sales always gave me the opportunity to dream, such as walking into a home and seeing a PRB oil etc on the wall.
    Also was able to buy Kelmscott Press books and Pre Raphaelite Poetry such as Rossetti’s sister and others. Rossetti is still coursing through my veins, as close as I got was a painting mixed media on artist made paper, by James Collinson. Sold it at Sotheby’s London c. 1998 or so…perhaps Christie’s.
    I am currently living in Seattle and would love to see this exhibition. I can tell that it’s great by the smile on your face.
    Sincerely
    Gabor Varga
    ….

  2. Since about 1972, I have been a particularly strong follower and “Lover” of the PRB, especially DG Rossetti. I once (back then) owned a copy and in (pristine condition) of Dante’s La Vita Nuova.
    This had never been translated prior to the time that DG Rossetti translated it, illustrated it, had it printed in an edition of 500 or perhaps even less.
    Rossetti had it printed on Japaned Vellum, with full page engravings (illustrations) with silk tissue in front of each engraving, and a dark blue Leather on board cover with a deeply embossed illustrated cover. I bought it along with many other pieces from the estate of a very famous American artist and Futurist… Raymond Johnson.
    He owned an English style Arts and Crafts home in Lake Oswego Oregon. Also he either handmade or carved or painted every square inch of the interior of this incredible home.
    I also was able to buy the First Edition 1856, also in pristine condition, The Grammar of Ornament by Owen Jones. This was in the late 1970? or perhaps early 1980?. The artists last name may have been spelled Jonson. Although he was a”Futurist” in style and genre, he was a true Arts and Crafts afficionado, such as Kelmscott or Mackmurdo or Voysey. He was more British in his homes interior decor and Art collection, than Tiffany or Elbert Hubbard or the Californians such as Greene and Greene etc. His studio which was in his home was absolutely filled with his art other art..objets des vertu, and incredible books
    I my wife and I had a shop/gallery in Portland named Bohemia and we went to every estate sale possible, often sleeping 2 nights (at least one) in the car to insure being either 1st, 2nd or 3rd to enter the home at opening.
    Portland Oregon was a unique “Goldmine” in those days. I was able to buy original 2nd school PRB drawings and works on paper.
    The estate sales always gave me the opportunity to dream, such as walking into a home and seeing a PRB oil etc on the wall.
    Also was able to buy Kelmscott Press books and Pre Raphaelite Poetry such as Rossetti’s sister and others. Rossetti is still coursing through my veins, as close as I got was a painting mixed media on artist made paper, by James Collinson. Sold it at Sotheby’s London c. 1998 or so…perhaps Christie’s.
    I am currently living in Seattle and would love to see this exhibition. I can tell that it’s great by the smile on your face.
    Sincerely
    Gabor Varga

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