Evelyn De Morgan

Evelyn De Morgan

Evelyn De Morgan, the niece of Pre-Raphaelite artist John Roddam Spencer Stanhope, showed an aptitude for drawing at a young age, taking art lessons by age fifteen and submitting prize-winning studies at both South Kensington and the Slade Schools.

When she married ceramicist William De Morgan, the two lovestruck artists forged a bond and dedicated themselves to filling the world with beauty.

Portrait of William De Morgan by Evelyn De Morgan

Evelyn’s work often contains allegorical themes, and the pieces she created during both the Boer War and World War I reflect her pacifist ideals. 

The Field of the Slain, Evelyn De Morgan
The Field of the Slain, Evelyn De Morgan

Much of Evelyn’s art shows the influence of her travels in Italy. Her gorgeous Flora draws inspiration from both Botticelli’s Primavera and The Birth of Venus, blending aspects from two iconic Botticelli pieces that are very similar to each other. In doing so, De Morgan creates a fresh take on Flora, folding in her admiration for early Italian art.

Flora, Evelyn De Morgan
Flora, Evelyn De Morgan

Evelyn also painted one of the most famous Pre-Raphalite beauties, Jane Morris, decades after Jane’s fame as Rossetti’s muse. 

Study of Jane Morris by Evelyn De Morgan
Study of Jane Morris by Evelyn De Morgan
Jane Morris in The Hour Glass by Evelyn De Morgan
Jane Morris in The Hour Glass, Evelyn De Morgan (1905)

Like her Pre-Raphaelite predecessors, Evelyn gravitated to the depiction of narratives based on literature, legends, and myths, but she creatively and innovatively also depicted her Spiritualist concepts. These are often shown using beautiful women to personify intangible qualities such a the soul, love, or hope.

The Passing of the Soul at Death, Evelyn De Morgan
The Passing of the Soul at Death, Evelyn De Morgan
Hope in the Prison of Despair, Evelyn De Morgan
Hope in the Prison of Despair, Evelyn De Morgan

Evelyn’s use of symbolism was also a reflection of the freedom she experienced as an artist. She and her husband had grown quite comfortable financially and she had the good fortune not afforded to most female artists at the time – the ability to express herself freely and to choose her own subjects.


Evelyn De Morgan Posts

The Artist’s Soul

‘See me, and know me as I am.’   Self portrait of Dante Gabriel Rossetti at age eighteen. At the age of twenty-one, Dante Gabriel Rossetti wrote the …
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Tangled Up in Bloom

“Bloom where you are planted” is an adage we’ve all probably heard, and the sentiment is a positive one: do your best no matter what …
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On Storms

“Tones sound, and roar and storm about me until I have set them down in notes.” Ludwig van Beethoven I’ve mentioned Evelyn De Morgan’s painting The …
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Jane Morris in The Hour Glass by Evelyn De Morgan

On Aging

Jane Morris was swept into the Pre-Raphaelite world at age eighteen.  She was La Belle Iseult to William Morris, who declared “I cannot paint you; but I …
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